Last 2 Uncalled Midterm Races Are Leaning – Both Elections Are Tilting Towards the Republicans
By Ben Dutka|November 25, 2022
Last 2 Uncalled Midterm Races Are Leaning – Both Elections Are Tilting Towards the Republicans

The midterm elections are just about over and despite not enjoying a massive “red wave,” Republicans did reclaim the House majority.

However, as that majority is small, every seat is crucial for future voting. That’s why the GOP is closely watching the final two races, which have been hanging in the balance for days.

But the good news is this: it looks like both are now leaning red.

In Colorado, Rep. Lauren Boebert was expected to easily defend her seat, but she faced an unexpectedly fierce battle with Democrat opponent Adam Frisch.

For a while, Frisch actually held the lead, which sparked plenty of surprised headlines across the country. But as more ballots were counted from right-leaning areas, Boebert began to catch up.

Then the Republican firebrand passed her opponent and has remained ahead, if only by the slimmest of margins.

At this point, she leads by just 554 votes, less than 0.5% — but she has already declared victory. If the gap remains below 0.5%, state law does require a recount, but those rarely go the loser’s way.

And out in California (via NTD):

In the redrawn 12th Congressional District in California, John Duarte, a Republican Party candidate, received 50.2 percent of the total votes as 99 percent of the votes have been tabulated. Democrat candidate Adam Gray trailed Duarte by 593 votes, less than 0.5 percent.

There’s no automatic recounting law in California.

If both Boebert and Duarte manage to eke out victories, that will give Republicans a 9-seat advantage in the House: 222 – 213.

In more good news for the Republican Party, the Cook Political Report showed the GOP easily took the overall popular vote, by a whopping 3.3 million.

Cook Political Report founder Charlie Cook said that while the GOP got the votes they needed, they just didn’t get them “where they needed them most.” This led to gaining fewer seats than anticipated.

Also, the popular vote didn’t really give Republicans the edge because of redistricting, and GOP voters “are more concentrated than before.”

But there’s one other detail that will prove encouraging for right-wing Americans, according to Cook:

Republican House candidates won 58 percent of the popular vote in the South and 53 percent in the Midwest, two regions that together account for 298 of the 538 electoral votes.

Duplicating that support is one way an unproblematic Republican nominee could top 270 electoral votes in 2024.

So far, only former President Donald Trump has officially announced a campaign for 2024, and it appears his popularity has greatly declined in recent weeks.

Many are hoping Florida Governor Ron DeSantis runs, because he appears to be the new party frontrunner. On the flip side, many wonder if current POTUS Joe Biden really will run again.

Either way, Republicans are certainly focused on 2024 now — getting the White House back will be their top priority for the next few years.

Key Takeaways:

  • The last 2 House races are leaning Republican, which would give the GOP a 9-seat majority in the House.
  • A recent report showed Republicans won the popular vote by 3.3 million.
  • They also won 58 percent of the popular vote in the South, and 53 percent in the Midwest.

Source: NTD

Ben Dutka
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
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