Blue State Defies Supreme Court Election Ruling – They Still Plan to Count Misdated Ballots in Pennsylvania
By Ben Dutka|October 13, 2022
Blue State Defies Supreme Court Election Ruling – They Still Plan to Count Misdated Ballots in Pennsylvania

The issue of election integrity will once again take center-stage next month when midterm voting begins. Many states have passed rules and guidelines designed to clamp down on voter fraud.

The Supreme Court has worked to increase the reliability of our voting system as well. For example, they recently issued guidance concerning inaccurate mail-in ballots.

However, one state says this guidance doesn’t affect a previous Commonwealth Court ruling. 

SCOTUS suggested that states shouldn’t count ballots that arrive in misdated envelopes, or ballots that contain other typos or errors. This was to ensure that only properly filled-out ballots would be considered.

But in Pennsylvania, they’re going to continue counting mail-in ballots that contain these errors.

Secretary of State Leigh Chapman announced that PA election officials shouldn’t disregard such ballots, because she believes that just because someone forgot an “irrelevant date,” it shouldn’t discount the ballot.

As she stated (via Fox News):

Every county is expected to include undated ballots in their official returns for the Nov. 8 election, consistent with the Department of State’s guidance.

That guidance followed the most recent ruling of the Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court holding that both Pennsylvania and federal law prohibit excluding legal votes because the voter omitted an irrelevant date on the ballot return envelope.

In a follow-up tweet, she specifically cited the Supreme Court ruling:

In May of this year, the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that ballots in undated envelopes must be counted.

The judges also said that a handwritten date “has no bearing on a voter’s eligibility.” Not long after, though, SCOTUS ruled that this decision was moot and returned to established election law.

But Chapman maintains that the Supreme Court’s ruling doesn’t affect the state’s election protocol.

Some citizens worry that it’s about more than just a handwritten date — they say that officials will keep counting ballots with other errors and typos as well, and this could lead to problems.

Others remain concerned about fraud perpetrated by individuals, as numerous cased have been reported in recent years.

Ever since the 2020 presidential election, questions concerning the reliability of mail-in ballots have swirled. Though now, over half the states in the country allow “no-excuse absentee voting.” PA is one such state.

Many Republican leaders claim there’s still widespread potential for fraud, and that will undoubtedly play a major role in all national elections moving forward.

Key Takeaways:

  • Pennsylvania will ignore a recent SCOTUS ruling concerning misdated mail-in ballot envelopes.
  • The state says the ruling doesn’t impact their election protocol.
  • Many Americans worry that the mail-in ballot system is seriously flawed, and the potential for fraud is still too great.

Source: Fox News

Ben Dutka
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
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